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of new york, the city's youngest mayor and the first mayor of color and at the age of 24, just last january, he was sworn in after winning a sweeping a town -- 18 out of 18 districts and winning a four-way mayoral race. before being appointed he was on the city -- the common counsel representing this witty woody's 4th ward. he is a graduate of cornell university where he majored in communications and he was quite active while he was there tutoring underserved students at ithaca and serving as a board member of the racing education attainment challenge organization. immediately to my right is alex morse who is the mayor of holyoke massachusetts. he is also the city's youngest mayor. and he is the second youngest mayor in state history. is that correct? yeah, so he graduated from brown university with a degree in urban studies and during his time at brown he worked as a youth career counselor. he was also on the governors lgbt commission and the main focus of his administration at the moment are early childhood literacy, building an economy focused around art, innovation and technolog
. we in michigan have to decide in november whether to allow the state to come in to the city and as a public use to take over and print the financial manager were emergency manager for the cities that have financed the distress and take over the local government where they can come in and remove the city officials like the mayor and the city council. i don't think that's the the presidential candidate mitt romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it
bailouts. and also one other thing, she's raised more money out of new york city than has the city of reno. i have raised more none in this campaign in the city of reno than new york city. she's raised more money out of wall street than i have in this campaign. who's in the pockets of the big money in wall street? >> moderator: thank you very much. our next question comes from diego santiago who will direct it to congresswoman shelley berkeley. >> congresswoman berkeley, i was intrigued looking through both of your web sites that both the candidates have the country of israel as one of your top issues. now i ask, why is this issue at the top of your agenda, and has enough been done to defend our only true ally in the middle east? berkeley: i pride myself on being a strong supporter of israel. in the united states congress on either side of the aisle, we share a common bond, and it's the only democracy in a very dangerous part of the world and one of our strongest allies in the world. i think we need to do everything we can to work with israel to insure that iran does not acquire nuclear we
major cities or small cities to the countryside. very difficult in my experience, through important trade which defined them and world view previous. i can have a few words to that. endurance, adaptability, confidence, sometimes over confidence. i think it's important to know this generation. in many ways, and also later day studying college. this early 1980s was the most liberal period in china's education system. they were really exposed to western ideas. they translate the constitution of development of foreign countries in uk and elsewhere into chinese. he reads english very well. now, that's really a wonderful opportunity, and, but these also could be the problem it has if we fail to understand that, this is a generation because of their personal experience they don't want to be lectured. they actually will be more, conducive with and get soft approach to talk for cooperation. but you just use force to intimidate them, they will act very first home. i hope that what i said is important. that if we use force, use just a single-minded lecture, we don't solve the knowledge of chin
, there was an achievement gap in math to apply for the lottery and the average licensing and all of your city. i have to say this on c-span just in case she is watching. one christmas i was alone in cambridge, massachusetts, and i was feeling the holiday blues and i wanted to make my grandmother's coconut cake. and she said oh, it's really simple. you start with two cups of sugar, you boil it. and i said, dan? and she gave me directions that sounded like -- i went to my grandmother's house around thanksgiving and i just annoyed her in the kitchen. but she would grab the flour with her hands and i would put up underneath. and i would sprinkle the flour in and i backed out the recipe. again, it annoyed her, but i had a recipe that i can now give my children and grandchildren. we spent two years trying to do something like that with charter schools. the average charter school is no different than the average public school. that is an important fact. what is interesting about charters is that there is a huge amount of charter schools are doing phenomenal things for kids. they are not doing good things at all fo
voted so look, in campaigns from presidential down to city council every aspect of the campaign message turnout. i think the air wars are the ones that get all the coverage on tv but i think the ground wars will be equally important. look, i think the other thing about the electorate is at least in "the wall street journal" colin the nbc poll that the two firms collaborated on it was pre-debate. you know the president was winning independent voters by 13 points. and, in 2008 he defeated john mccain by 8% with independent smacks so with the admonition of less -- let's wait until the dust has settled and see the polls in the next couple of days i'm going to be looking at the numbers in the other thing very quickly in terms of the minority vote. the other thing about barack obama's election in 2008 was the one something on the order of 43% of the white vote and in most of the national polls that is kind of where he is so that will be another number to look out for. the country is changing and in 2008, three-quarters of the electorate was white which was down from the mid-to high 80s 20 yea
in the iowa delegation on a continual basis. in 2008 when the floods hit in iowa city i went over there immediately and flew over all that and went on the ground and met with the leaders of cedar rapids for example for the democrats that represent that part of the state. they didn't take me about but rejoined me together and everything. when we get hit with floods on the side of the state become over and join me. i introduced legislation to protect us from the next flood coming down the missouri river with the sign on right away. that is the bipartisanship the you get in a national disaster. they are less partisan and congress but we have had a broad bipartisan effort here with an iowa working with those things that matter to iowa and hopefully i will be able to get a bipartisan support on the farm bill like a forgotten by partisans of along the missouri river legislation. h.r. 2942 in case you want to google that. >> moderator: mrs. vilsack how did you cut through the partisanship and build consensus in congress? vilsack: i was with amy klobuchar yesterday and she is someone that
and if we can get to all of the components. in 2009 after president obama took office the city was sacked included new credits that were primarily focused on low-income families and families that have kids in college that were extended in 2010 and expired at the end of the year. there's the timber cut in social security payroll taxes the was done in the stimulus for 2011 and extended for 2012. and then in addition to all of those expiring tax provisions that got most of the attention from the fiscal macroeconomic point of view and another thing we have to the start of next year and the tax increases included in the 2010 health reform act. and so, when you look at the debate over the fiscal cliff, the point is to recognize there is a very diverse array of tax provisions that are under discussion. and that's important for understanding the effects on american households, different households are affected differently by these provisions. at the low end of the income distribution for example the credits that were enacted in 2009 turn out to be very important as the temporary payroll taxes. te
of many others in the city and not just like ourselves. >> mark, do you want to pose the last question? >> just a quick one. something not addressed in the comments by deputy secretary carter, and it's rarely mentioned, but taiwan, under its existing republic china constitution, is an independent sorch state, the absent of relations does not sub tract from the reality. with this in mine, there's sensitivities with beijing. i'm curious, what potential role could taiwan play in u.s. rebalancing in asia? what are we missing now, and what could be done more in leveraging with what taiwan has to offer with the united states and its interests? >> this is a trap. [laughter] he knows the answer to the question. [laughter] i will fall into it anyway. [laughter] my own view, and this is a whole, you know, i think other conversation about building fore structure and capacity in asia pacific is that the states that are a bit weaker than china can pull a page out of china and develop their own anti-access scenario and denial capabilities and make it woefully painful for china to project power into
is more global, it's more commercial, and it's more financially complex. the real city truer today than it was yesterday. and it will be truer tomorrow than it is today. the defense industry in the suppliers that it is made up of are constantly changing and adapting to the department rierpts, and conditions set phot in the commercial marketplace. this evolution in the base brings with it new and difficult challenges. and it begs for a flexible, adaptive approach to the ever changing realty on the ground. outdating con instructs of the estatic where the u.s. government could dictate certain insurances or impose flexible rules must giveaway to the facts on the ground that the base is no longer a sing -- policy must take this these in to account and develop a more sophisticated and nuanced view of the base. the goods and services the department relies upon reaches far deeper in to the overall global economy than most appreciate. there are unique items for us, the items themselves often reply upon a complex supply chain of providers that are restricted or comp prized would jeopardize the --
but he has lived in new york city for about 11 years. republicans, even before he gotten in were naming him big apple bob. yes family, has a son, a wife there. i think it moved to nebraska since the fed done everything they can to paint him as a new york liberal. nebraska has just shifted conservative. it should become a more red state. >> once again you can see that debate from omaha live at noon eastern on our companion network c-span. right after that remarks from the president of yemen on the future of this country invite of security problems and the hunger crisis. he will speak at of the woodrow wilson center in washington and you can see those comments live at 1 p.m. eastern. coming up tonight, more campaign 2012 coverage with a life wisconsin senate debate. congresswoman tammy baldwin debates former health secretary tommy thompson who is republican. that seat is open due to the retirement of democratic senator herb kohl. you can see it live at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span. you can also listen on c-span radio or watch online at c-span.org. >> the reason why i like that is simply becau
. [applause] we succeeded, we succeeded because of our outstanding police. and let us in the city of manchester show our appreciation's for what the extraordinary police men and women of our country do for our country. [applause] and how we succeeded, and this is a real lesson. we succeeded because of a group of individuals, a group of individuals who saw the odds against london's bid, and thought, nevermind. we are going to pioneer the bid for london. we're going to fight for the bid for london. we're going to win the bid for london, to our very own -- [inaudible] [applause] but, you know, what? you know what what, friends, we succeeded with one reason more than of the. we succeeded because of us. we succeeded because of us. us, the british people. us the british people, welcome the athletes from abroad, who cheered them on, and found ourselves talking to each other each morning about what happened at the olympics the night before in a way we haven't talked to each other before. we succeeded because we came together as a country. we worked together as a country. we join together
so many times i think that cities and states, provinces around the world are waiting always for some action on a national level. for instance, about mental issues. the fact of the matter is the local government can actually do about we had a disagreement with washington in the bush administration, but we moved forward. we didn't wait for anybody. they made commitments for 25% and 85% came up with three renewal and the list goes on. all those things we did and actually so much so secretary-general ban keynote spoke at the opening session of the u.n. to encourage all the other countries to go in the same direction and if the national government, the subnational government would have the power and create an organization to encourage subnational government to go in the direction and not to wait for the national government. severe environmental issues are so many other issues you can address any subnational level. you are to teach that and make people aware of states and cities and counties. i think it is a macro program. i want to thank y'all so much for coming in. [applause] those of yo
a kurdish city today. and if kurds -- and if they became a kurdish city all of a sudden the town and went under the town under the administration of the kurdish territory. at that point, one would say, and i wager that the kurds would declare independents. now, that's really requires three things, i think, from the kurdish standpoint as far as i can tell. it would require that to get the oil, they to be able to get the oil out, the problem of the area is that, you know, you have oil, you are to get it out of there. you can only get it out by pipeline. today there is a pipeline from the field which has the example of 1.57 million barrels which go down in the iraqi territory and up to turkey. it goes through iraqi land, so to speak. the iraq i cans could block the pipeline. the kurds would to build, and they already signed a contract with the turkish company to put up the pipeline directly through their own territory in to tour ski. they would also have to have turkish deport. for the pipeline to work it has to go through the kurdish territories in to turkey. and the have turks have to eye
. and actually stayed in one. i stayed at hyatt at salt lake city airport this summer and the ceres of hotels, is the front desk is actually also the starbucks and also the breakfast counter. same person who checks you in, gets your coffee and your danish. that is simple, everyone is be looking to do more things with fewer people. and therefore instead of 25,000-person factory, we need 50 people creating jobs for 20. we need 20 creating jobs for 30. we need 30 creating jobs for 40. and i think it is going to require a really different approach to the economy. different set of incentives laws, different approach to education. we do manpower development over here and have education department here and the two aren't connected. we have to completely merge them. in an ideal world that is what the election would be about. romney's view produce more startups versus obama's. it's not. but sooner or later that's where we will have to go to. >> let's go to the last group of questions because it is salient to that. talk about new actors and the rise of china. you might also carize it as the emergence o
suspect it's true of a lot of us we wanted to work in big cities for famous news organizations, and in the end when i look back on my early career frustrations the best thing in the world to me was going out to dumpy places and being a star and built my confidence. i was the best guy in the newsroom in places i won't even name the and it made me think i could actually do this. having done this the last 25 years. >> much better than being the youngest person in "the new york times." >> the last question. >> thank you very much. a lot of this election, a lot of the political coverage on television i'm sort of familiar with fat has been based on the pontificating that goes on every day and every night on the cable stations, and to a large extent somebody mentioned earlier i believe -- i forget the name of the guy, i knew him very well, anyway, he was a "washington post" reporter who went out and covered the voters. he went around like anna sale. >> talking about david broder? >> yes, exactly. david went around and actually talked to voters. do you think that there is a basic weakn
to the moms and to the providers are given new york city three-quarters of families on a waiting list reported that their childcare arrangements were negatively affecting their children. one parent from minnesota on the waiting list that my child is six months old and has been in three horrible daycare center in athens. research is clear that parents are more likely to work if they have reliable childcare and they find it very challenging to work when they do not. in north carolina about one out of four families on the states waiting list has lost or quit their jobs while waiting for childcare assistance. a minnesota parent describe a loss of job after eight months because upsets in my schedule due to babysitting problems. is conscientious about lining up childcare arrangements that disruptions caused everything that i had carefully plan to come tumbling down. low income moms live on the edge. they face so many challenges and childcare assistance is a lifeline. they are our countless other stories about moms who have benefited from childcare assistance but time is short. there's no way you can
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17